Learning Made Easy Poker Variations For Beginners



Although learning how to play the game can be a daunting task, there are many easy poker variations for beginners that make the learning process easier.

Texas Hold'Em



Texas Hold'Em is one of the most popular forms of poker. In this game, after the initial antes (forced bets that must be made by everyone participating) and blinds (forced bets made by the two players after the dealer), all participants are given two personal cards that are kept hidden until the final showdown. During the first round of wagering, also known as the flop, three community cards are turned over. After that round, the fourth and the fifth, called the turn and the river respectively, are exposed, and players finish their hands using all of the options that are available to them.

Seven-Card Stud



In this unique variant, the game begins as two face-down cards are dealt to everyone right before betting begins. After betting, each person is dealt five for their own personal use with none for the community to share. Over the next several rounds, one more is dealt to each player face-up each time. The seventh that is dealt this way is given face-down and the last bets are put in before trying to create the strongest possible hand to win the pot.

Choosing a Venue



It is important to make sure that the establishments that offer easy poker variations for beginners are trustworthy (especially when using online casinos). Once a comfortable, known, trustworthy establishment has been found, all that's really needed to begin is the knowledge and strategy behind the game, and, of course, a credit card. Another thing to look for with online casinos is bonus codes and promotions that may improve the experience.

Tips and Tricks



Most forms of the game follow the same basic rules and regulations, so that means that they are easy poker variations for beginners. Always keep in mind that playing more will not make up for a losing streak, and that just because someone has chips in the pot does not mean they should stay in a hand. Learning to read and react according to the opposition is one of the hallmarks of any good poker player.